Insurers slam delays in Riot Act payments

Insurers reacted quickly to help customers hit by last August’s riots, but the riot compensation scheme failed too many Londoners the ABI (Association of British Insurers) said today at the London Assembly.

With latest figures showing that just over half of the 3,487 claims made by

The Association of British Insurers said people without cover were facing unnecessary delay in payments from Police under the Riot (Damages) Act 1886

Londoners to the Metropolitan Police for compensation for property damage sustained in the riots have either been rejected or discontinued, the ABI is urging the Government to overhaul the Riot (Damages) Act 1886, under which police authorities are required to pay compensation to those affected.

Appearing before the London Assembly today Nick Starling, the ABI’s Director of General Insurance, said:

“Insurers reacted quickly to help thousands of Londoners hit by last August’s riots. In one case, within one week of the riots an insurer had made an initial payment of £100,000 to their customer in south London to enable them to hire temporary trading premises to resume trading and stay in business. Overall, insurers expect to pay out £200 million in respect of riot damage to homes, businesses and vehicles.”

“Yet too many people without insurance, or who are under-insured, have and continue to face unacceptable delays and bureaucracy in claiming the compensation they are entitled to from the police authorities. This compounds their distress and puts them under even more financial pressure.

“Londoners need and deserve a much more streamlined and standardised compensation process. A more effective compensation process will also ensure that insurance to cover riot damage remains widely available in the capital. We urge the Government to review and update the Riot (Damages) Act to ensure that it meets to needs of modern day London”.

About Ralph Savage (140 Articles)
Insurance and legal journalist Ralph Savage has written extensively for the financial and professional services sectors, most notably as News Editor of Post Magazine. He ghost writes regularly on behalf of FTSE 250 CEOs, leading counsel and senior professionals including solicitors, insurers, accountants and brokers.

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